Joy to You

HomeFriends, Click Here to Get Your Mail
Click to return to the "Books" home page

The Training of the Human Plant


HOME

HIGHLIGHTS
MORE BURBANK

sb-original pages.gif (471 bytes)
FRONT
INTRODUCTION
DEDICATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
BACK

sb-text pages.gif (363 bytes)
INTRODUCTION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI

 

   
  More Options...

 



I
THE MINGLING OF RACES

During the course of many years of investigation into the plant life of the world, creating new forms, modifying old ones, adapting others to new conditions, and blending still others, I have constantly been impressed with the similarity between the organization and development of plant and human life. While I have never lost sight of the principle of the survival of the fittest and all that it implies as an explanation of the development and progress of plant life, I have come to find in the crossing of species and in selection, wisely directed, a great and powerful instrument for the transformation of the vegetable kingdom along lines that lead constantly upward. The crossing of species is to me paramount. Upon it, wisely directed and accompanied by a rigid selection of the best and as rigid an exclusion of the poorest, rests the hope of all progress. The mere crossing of species, unaccompanied by selection, wise supervision, intelligent care, and the utmost patience, is not likely to result in marked good, and may result in vast harm. Unorganized effort is often most vicious in its tendencies.

Before passing to the consideration of the adaptation of the principles of plant culture and improvement in a more or less modified form to the human being, let me lay emphasis on the opportunity now presented in the United States for observing and, if we are wise, aiding in what I think it fair to say is the grandest opportunity ever presented of developing the finest race the world has ever known out of the vast mingling of races brought here by immigration.

By statistical abstract on immigration, prepared by the Bureau of Statistics of the Department of Commerce and Labor in Washington, I find, that, in the year 1904, 752,864 immigrants came into the United States, assigned to more than fifty distinct nationalities. It will be worth while to look carefully at this list. It shows how widely separated geographically, as well as ethnologically, is the material from which we are drawing in this colossal example of the crossing of species:

The Mingling of Races diagram.

[This is the original diagram scanned from the book]

Study this list from any point of view. Where has there been found a broader opportunity for the working out of these underlying principles? Some of these immigrants will mate with others of their own class, notably the Jews, thus not markedly changing the current; many will unite with others of allied speech; still others marry into races wholly different from their own, while a far smaller number will perhaps find union with what we may call native stock.

But wait until two decades have passed, until there are children of age to wed, and then see, under the changed conditions, how widespread will be the mingling. So from the first the foreign nations have been pouring into this country and taking their part in this vast blending.

Now, just as the plant breeder always notices sudden changes and breaks, as well as many minor modifications, when he joins two or more plants of diverse type from widely separated quarters of the globe, --sometimes merging an absolutely wild strain with one that, long over-civilized, has largely lost virility,-and just as he finds among the descendants a plant which is likely to be stronger and better than either ancestor, so may we notice constant changes and breaks and modifications going on about us in this vast combination of races, and so may we hope for a far stronger and better race if right principles are followed, a magnificent race, far superior to any preceding it. Look at the material on which to draw! Here is the North, powerful, virile, aggressive, blended with the luxurious, ease-loving, more impetuous South. Again you have the merging of a cold phlegmatic temperament with one mercurial and volatile. Still again the union of great native mental strength, developed or undeveloped, with bodily vigor, but with inferior mind. See, too, what a vast number of environmental influences have been at work in social relations, in climate, in physical surroundings. Along with this we must observe the merging of the vicious with the good, the good with the good, the vicious with the vicious.

Contents     Next Chapter

(This is the text version. See the photographed version.)

Footnotes

 



chapter 1chapter 1chapter 1chapter 1chapter 1chapter 1chapter 1chapter 1chapter 1

Luther Burbank

 

 

 Quote
The crossing of species is to me paramount. Upon it, wisely directed and accompanied by a rigid selection of the best and as rigid an exclusion of the poorest, rests the hope of all progress. more...
Quote

 

 

Joy to You


HOME  |  SEARCH  |  SITE MAP  |  COMMENTS  |  ABOUT THIS SITE

PLEASE DIRECT QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT THIS SITE TO SCOTTG @ JOYTOYOU.COM

THIS PAGE UPDATED ON Wednesday, April 11, 2012
.